The slackness here is lack of vision

In today’s Gleaner an article was published about a 14 year old girl, who while being tried for murder, was not known to be pregnant. She has since given birth.

http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20120830/lead/lead1.html

Above is the link to the article.

Does anyone else here think that the focus is a bit askew? Not that is isn’t reprehensible that she has been impregnated by an adult and not that is isn’t commendable that both her parents are being held responsible; but the pregnancy is just a symptom of a larger disease.

Simply put, the child is ill and needs help. Why do we suffer from such grave myopia?! This CHILD, was convicted of MURDER and is being tried on ASSAULT. She needs help, both from social and psychiatric services. It’s not commonplace for even the most wayward 13 year old to stab someone in the neck. But we focus on the belly and how she’s been wronged in that respect.

She was wronged by the system that failed to recognise her symptoms early, by the system that failed to rehabilitate her and by the system who continues to fail by focussing on he pregnancy.

Social and psychiatric services for children should focus on identification of those in need and rehabilitation, instead of trying to out the fire when children end up pregnant and killing people.

Stone thrown.

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Holiday? For why?

1,2,3. We effectively swept the podium in the men’s 200m and celebrate we did, the world over. Jamaicans everywhere came to a professional standstill to hug, scream and, of course, let badmind prevail. (Poor Spearmon).

In true Jamdown fashion, we have begun those calls for a holiday. Why? We already won the race. We already swept the podium. Now, we need to get back to work so that we may keep our jobs, finance our budget and secure more money from the IMF. Didn’t we JUST celebrate both Emancipation and our Jubilee Independence?

Get it together. Honourable PM, no holiday needed here.

A nation united in badmind

1,2 and 9.63: the 2012 sprint season shot off with the Americans 0 for 2 with Pryce, Bolt and Blake denying them Gold (and silver) in the men’s and women’s 100m.

And we are a nation of badmind, and all is well. It’s just as much about winning as it is about beating the USA. For us, America is a place to shop, live and remit money ah yard. It is not a place deserving of sprint Olympic Gold and narry shall their national anthem play. Eternal father, eternally.

Congrats to our Athletes. Thanks for the independence gift and have a great birthday Bolt.

Ps. Please give it to them in the 200m, the 4×100 and the 4×400. Thanks.

Good hair/Bad hair

Good hair/Bad hair

All are in uproar about Gabby Douglas’ hair. Apparently, while trying to win Olympic Gold (the first for an African American in Gymnastics) and after having been only the second African American to make the US team, she neglected to get her hair did (pat that weave).

 

To paraphrase Madonna: “So?”

 

I’m intrigued by the concept of good hair. Culturally, and because of racial inferiority, we are driven by the need to imitate the white woman. To that end, every 6 weeks, women the world over, sit in a salon chair and plaster hair relaxer unto their hair and scalp. It burns, scars and some of us have even lost our hair. It’s been linked to cancer and increased frequency of headaches. We slowly poison ourselves.

 

The silver lining of the nappy headed cloud is that some of us have begun to wake up and embrace kinkiness. We sport our dreads, cornrows (or canerows). We “walk out” and flash the natty and I am proud.

 

 

Jamaica 5Olympics?

Is it me, or is Jamaica 50 more about Olympic Gold than anything else? Don’t get me wrong, as I said in my previous post, I’m an Olympic wagonist. I’m all up in the carriage of this bandwagon, wearing national colours and chanting for another 1, 2, 2 in every track event where this more than one Jamaican. I am also pleased to see that we have united in the quest for Olympic glory and it is simply prolific that our Independence celebration will have been paired with multiple Olympic wins. Don’t get me wrong.

 

However, this is our 50th year of independence. Not many of us recall colonial, pound and shilling Jamaica. Not may of us were present for our fight to independence. Not many of us recall Sir Alexander Bustamante as our first Prime Minister in a post colonial Jamaica. I am grateful for what educational effort the Government has made, but along with Olympic coverage, analysis and post mortems, we should be inundated by our colourful history. We should be wearing black, green and gold simply because we are Jamaican and we are a proud nation. The 30th Olympiad and our myriad of athletes should be the proverbial cherry atop a big, tasty independence cake!

 

There is so much more to Jamaica than fun, frolick and Olympic glory. Examine its depth.

 

PS. We will be visited by TS Ernesto in another day or so. My message is this: DO NOT interrupt cellphone or Television (or internet for that matter) service. For as a country, we will hunt you down and gut you. Thanks in advance for the cool temperatures and the much needed (but not too heavy) rains.

On matters of mental slavery and emancipation

As I drove by the half erected Jubilee village today, I reflected on the true symbolism of emancipation. Dancehall frivolity aside, on this day 178 years ago, our mother country finally conceded that the treacherous middle passage, bartering lives for pots and pans in West Africa and for money in the Caribbean, was reprehensible and that the slave trade be abolished.

To them, emancipation from physical slavery was one giant leap. To be free, what we now take for granted, must have brought insurmountable joy to our proud forefathers. So much abhorrence did our ancestors harbor, that they refused jobs on plantations and opted, instead, for education. We were once the pride of our mother nation.

What we take for granted now, our forefathers and mothers, in the forms of Daddy Sharpe, Cudjoe and Nanny, fought feverishly for. And yet, we remain shackled by greed and apathy. We remained shackled by a lack of education, poverty and the notion that our destiny is ordained by others, that the rich oppress us. We remain complacent with our station.

These invisible shackles, burn and cut more deeply than any middle passage simply because it is self inflicted.

Happy Emancipation Day, black, green and gold.